Massive Attack publish T.C.f.C.R live industry roadmap to Super Low Carbon Live Music

Following an extremely difficult & frustrating period for live music during the COVID19 pandemic, Massive Attack are now pleased to publish and offer as an open resource to our industry the Roadmap to Super Low Carbon Live Music, commissioned by the band & produced by the Tyndall Centre for Climate Change Research – a specialist body that brings together scientists, engineers, economists, and social scientists to accelerate society’s transition to a sustainable low carbon future and avert climate catastrophe.

More info: https://www.massiveattack.co.uk/

About Massive Attack:
Massive Attack are an English trip hop collective formed in 1988 in Bristol by Robert “3D” Del Naja, Adrian “Tricky” Thaws, Andrew “Mushroom” Vowles and Grant “Daddy G” Marshall.
The debut Massive Attack album Blue Lines was released in 1991, with the single “Unfinished Sympathy” reaching the charts and later being voted the 63rd greatest song of all time in a poll by NME. 1998’s Mezzanine (containing the top 10 single “Teardrop”) and 2003’s 100th Window charted in the UK at number one. Both Blue Lines and Mezzanine feature in Rolling Stone’s list of the 500 Greatest Albums of All Time.
The group has won numerous music awards throughout their career, including a Brit Award—winning Best British Dance Act, two MTV Europe Music Awards, and two Q Awards. They have released five studio albums that have sold over 13 million copies worldwide. Throughout their history, Massive Attack have been supporters and activists for political, human rights and environmental causes.
Robert Del Naja was critical of the then UK Labour government’s policies. He was strongly opposed to the 2003 war against Iraq, and with fellow musician Damon Albarn personally paid for full-page advertisements against the war in the NME magazine.
Massive Attack have worked with Campaign for Nuclear Disarmament and Stop the War Coalition, while also having helped fund a legal challenge to military intervention in international courts.

Comment from my side: although this is quite an important initiative, the fact that is labeled as open source without any indication of the availability of the freedom to share and remix the materials it becomes another case where the term open source is used in an incorrect way. Personally, I’ve seen this happen in many cases and it gives me the perception that more work is needed to clarify the usage of the term including Albania.

R.S